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Unique and Unorthodox treathments to get healthy

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  • Unique and Unorthodox treathments to get healthy



    Students perform Rubber Neti, an ancient yogic technique,
    in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh.
    Many Indians believe that Rubber Neti controls the common cold,
    cough and asthma and keeps the nasal passages clean.



    Mohmmed Emad, 41, lies buried neck-deep in the sand in the El Dakrror mountain area at Siwa Oasis, northwest of Cairo.
    The people in Siwa believe that being buried in the sand during the hottest time of the day is a therapeutic treatment
    which can cure rheumatism, joint pain and sexual impotency.



    A walnut is placed on a patient's eye and ignited dry moxa leaves in his ears during a traditional Chinese medical treatment for curing facial paralysis, at a hospital in Jinan, China.



    A resident receives horn cupping treatment on his back on a street in Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.
    Cupping is an alternative form of pain therapy that has been part of Chinese medicine for over 2,500 years.



    Haj Mohamed el-Minyawi allows one of his bees to sting a patient suffering from ear problems in Cairo.
    Minyawi believes that the bee stings have special properties,
    that when used on different parts of the body can cure ailments like kidney problems,
    appendicitis and even cancer. Minyami has opened his home to public and treats people from all over Cairo.



    Jiang Musheng, a 66-year-old resident, eats a live tree frog at a village in Shangrao,
    in eastern China's Jiangxi province. Jiang suffered from frequent abdominal pains and coughing 20 years ago,
    until an old man called Yang Dingcai suggested tree frogs as a remedy.



    A Kashmiri child shows his arm as he undergoes leech therapy in Hazratbal, on the outskirts of Srinagar. Leeches have been used for thousands of years for various medical treatment purposes.



    Consumers enjoy mud therapy at a nursing home in Anshan, east China's Liaoning province.
    The mineral mud is believed to be able to alleviate pain from rheumatoid arthritis, sequela of traumatisms and peripheral nervous system diseases.



    Peruvian Ety Napadenschi (L), who is eight month pregnant,
    is touched by a dolphin named Wayra during a therapy session for pregnant women at a hotel in Lima.
    The therapy is supposed to stimulate the brains of the baby inside the belly, with the dolphins high-frequency sounds, to develop neuron abilities.



    A man holds a terrapin, whose touch believed to cure rheumatism and other bodily ailments,
    as he prepares to treat the face of a villager in Kandal province, west of Phnom Penh.
    Belief in the supernatural healing powers of animals such as turtles,
    cows and snakes is a relatively common phenomenon in Cambodia.



    Visitors cover their bodies with black mud at a tourist resort in Daying County of Suning,
    south-western China's Sichuan province. The mineral-rich black mud is believed to be good for the skin, local media reported.



    Cambodia villagers collect the urine of a cow believed to have healing powers in Kompot province,
    south of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Belief in the supernatural healing powers of animals such as cows,
    snakes and turtles is relatively common in Cambodia, where more than third of the population lives on less than $1 a day and few can afford modern medicines.[/B]





    Students perform Rubber Neti, an ancient yogic technique,
    in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh.
    Many Indians believe that Rubber Neti controls the common cold,
    cough and asthma and keeps the nasal passages clean.



    Mohmmed Emad, 41, lies buried neck-deep in the sand in the El Dakrror mountain area at Siwa Oasis, northwest of Cairo.
    The people in Siwa believe that being buried in the sand during the hottest time of the day is a therapeutic treatment
    which can cure rheumatism, joint pain and sexual impotency.



    A walnut is placed on a patient's eye and ignited dry moxa leaves in his ears during a traditional Chinese medical treatment for curing facial paralysis, at a hospital in Jinan, China.



    A resident receives horn cupping treatment on his back on a street in Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.
    Cupping is an alternative form of pain therapy that has been part of Chinese medicine for over 2,500 years.



    Haj Mohamed el-Minyawi allows one of his bees to sting a patient suffering from ear problems in Cairo.
    Minyawi believes that the bee stings have special properties,
    that when used on different parts of the body can cure ailments like kidney problems,
    appendicitis and even cancer. Minyami has opened his home to public and treats people from all over Cairo.



    Jiang Musheng, a 66-year-old resident, eats a live tree frog at a village in Shangrao,
    in eastern China's Jiangxi province. Jiang suffered from frequent abdominal pains and coughing 20 years ago,
    until an old man called Yang Dingcai suggested tree frogs as a remedy.



    A Kashmiri child shows his arm as he undergoes leech therapy in Hazratbal, on the outskirts of Srinagar. Leeches have been used for thousands of years for various medical treatment purposes.



    Consumers enjoy mud therapy at a nursing home in Anshan, east China's Liaoning province.
    The mineral mud is believed to be able to alleviate pain from rheumatoid arthritis, sequela of traumatisms and peripheral nervous system diseases.



    Peruvian Ety Napadenschi (L), who is eight month pregnant,
    is touched by a dolphin named Wayra during a therapy session for pregnant women at a hotel in Lima.
    The therapy is supposed to stimulate the brains of the baby inside the belly, with the dolphins high-frequency sounds, to develop neuron abilities.



    A man holds a terrapin, whose touch believed to cure rheumatism and other bodily ailments,
    as he prepares to treat the face of a villager in Kandal province, west of Phnom Penh.
    Belief in the supernatural healing powers of animals such as turtles,
    cows and snakes is a relatively common phenomenon in Cambodia.



    Visitors cover their bodies with black mud at a tourist resort in Daying County of Suning,
    south-western China's Sichuan province. The mineral-rich black mud is believed to be good for the skin, local media reported.



    Cambodia villagers collect the urine of a cow believed to have healing powers in Kompot province,
    south of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Belief in the supernatural healing powers of animals such as cows,
    snakes and turtles is relatively common in Cambodia, where more than third of the population lives on less than $1 a day and few can afford modern medicines.[/B]
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